Wow I just reblog like nobody's business okay? I'm Jessica, 17/Female/Pansexual if for some reason someone cares.

27th August 2014

Post reblogged from Awesomesauce Apocalypse with 845,699 notes

When I was 16, I had a fake I.D. and decided to go to a gay bar by myself because some friends bailed on me. While there, an older gentleman bought me a drink. He wasn’t a creeper, and he definitely wasn’t unattractive. I accepted the drink and began talking to him. No big deal. As the hour progressed, I felt myself feeling strange. I mentioned that I felt like I had a headache, and this guy helped guide me out of the bar. As we were walking down the street, the thought of, ‘Oh god, he’s drugged me, I’m going to die’ came to my head. I tried to get away, but I was so drugged up that I could barely walk, let alone speak. It also didn’t help that I had really large ‘goth’ platform shoes because I was going through a phase. Anyway, this guy brought me to his suv and began undressing me. As a final act of defiance, I hit him over the head with my platform shoe. He then punched me, and I remember thinking, ‘Why don’t they ever give workshops to gay guys about being victims of rape too?’ While I was as careful as possible, I never saw the guy slip something in the drink. I even watched the bar tender make the drink. Anyway, I lied there completely paralyzed while this pervert was lubing up. I locked eyes with his for a moment, and that’s when it happened. A very large and angry drag queen opened the door of the vehicle and beat the shit out of my attempted rapist. She and her other drag friends helped dress and care for me while the police arrived. I was saved by a group of guardian drag queens. They were basically the modern day ‘angels from heaven.’

sexual-phan:

hunter-avenger-consulter-grimm:

jawnn-locked:

visiovisusvidere:

sonicghost:

milesjai:

videk:

welcome-to-the-sinners-ball:

imgayitsok:

God bless drag queens.

I will always reblog this

Whenever drag queens are present, you best believe they will save the fuckin day.

Oh fuck yes.

image

If this isn’t on your blog I’m judging you.

Every time a bell rings, a drag queen gets his wings.

God bless drag queen omg

Source: b-random

27th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from LEMONS with 94,366 notes

buttsweats:

where i work we rent out a variety of buildings and to make a long story short i’m going to hell

Source: buttsweats

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from [rjeSTUDIO] with 7,862 notes

rjestudio:

ethiopienne:

on today’s episode of me having feelings, a series of tweets about “anti-rape nail polish.”

the article above is very very good and everyone should read it this is the part I like the most: […] They allow us to conceive of rapists as recognizable, Snidely Whiplash–style villains, so we never have to consider that they might be our local and national football heroes, our police officers, our doctors, our dentists, our beloved television personalities, our teachers, our clergy, our neighbors, or our classmates. The bad guy slips something into a drink, the good girl sticks her finger in it until it changes color, and presto, you’ve got an airtight case! […][…]All these clever products do is reinforce a terribly bleak message: Somebody’s going to get raped. If you work hard at making sure it isn’t you, maybe it won’t be.
“But we have to tell women to protect themselves!” say the mighty defenders of the status quo, every time. “The criminals don’t listen!”
This is untrue. Snidely Whiplash doesn’t listen, because he’s a fictional character, but real rapists are listening to the people around them all the time. They hear that women are bitches and sluts and objects; that women who drink or dress a certain way “deserve whatever they get”; that guys who “don’t need to rape anyone” to get laid couldn’t possibly force a woman. They hear victims called “accusers” and hear everyone question the “accuser’s” account of what happened, as though she herself has been accused of a crime. […][…]They hear about their peers being accused of rape and still allowed to graduate from college, while the alleged victims drop out of school. They hear that most rapes are never reported, and of those, very few are prosecuted. About those, they usually hear “not guilty.”
Criminals do listen to what we, as a society, tell them—and what we tell rapists, time and again, is that we don’t take their crime seriously, so they can probably get away with it. If other young men out there earnestly want to prevent rape, they’d be better off talking to their peers about consent, calling out other guys who dehumanize women, and intervening when they see something that makes them uncomfortable. […]

rjestudio:

ethiopienne:

on today’s episode of me having feelings, a series of tweets about “anti-rape nail polish.”

the article above is very very good and everyone should read it 
this is the part I like the most: 

[…] They allow us to conceive of rapists as recognizable, Snidely Whiplash–style villains, so we never have to consider that they might be our local and national football heroes, our police officers, our doctors, our dentists, our beloved television personalities, our teachers, our clergy, our neighbors, or our classmates. The bad guy slips something into a drink, the good girl sticks her finger in it until it changes color, and presto, you’ve got an airtight case! […]

[…]
All these clever products do is reinforce a terribly bleak message: Somebody’s going to get raped. If you work hard at making sure it isn’t you, maybe it won’t be.

“But we have to tell women to protect themselves!” say the mighty defenders of the status quo, every time. “The criminals don’t listen!”

This is untrue. Snidely Whiplash doesn’t listen, because he’s a fictional character, but real rapists are listening to the people around them all the time. They hear that women are bitches and sluts and objects; that women who drink or dress a certain way “deserve whatever they get”; that guys who “don’t need to rape anyone” to get laid couldn’t possibly force a woman. They hear victims called “accusers” and hear everyone question the “accuser’s” account of what happened, as though she herself has been accused of a crime. […]

[…]They hear about their peers being accused of rape and still allowed to graduate from college, while the alleged victims drop out of school. They hear that most rapes are never reported, and of those, very few are prosecuted. About those, they usually hear “not guilty.”

Criminals do listen to what we, as a society, tell them—and what we tell rapists, time and again, is that we don’t take their crime seriously, so they can probably get away with it. If other young men out there earnestly want to prevent rape, they’d be better off talking to their peers about consent, calling out other guys who dehumanize women, and intervening when they see something that makes them uncomfortable. […]

Source: ethiopienne

27th August 2014

Post reblogged from LEMONS with 39,586 notes

samdesantis:

sometimes you get so close to a person you forget you’re telling them things you’ve never even said out loud before

Source: samdesantis

27th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from I know there are Tootsie Rolls in here somewhere! with 2,667 notes

huffingtonpost:

STEPHEN COLBERT STEPS OUT OF CHARACTER, OFFERS HEARTFELT ADVICE TO YOUNG WOMEN

Stephen Colbert wants to talk to you about your boyfriend.

When Colbert sat down for Rookie’s “Ask A Grown Man” segment, he did so as himself, instead of the brash character he plays on his show.

Watch the full video and get all of Colbert’s wisdom and advice here. 

Source: huffingtonpost

27th August 2014

Quote reblogged from Burning Holes In The Dark with 193,668 notes

The hardest thing about depression is that it is addictive. It begins to feel uncomfortable not to be depressed. You feel guilty for feeling happy.
— Pete Wentz (via perfect)

Source: hopelesslyhealing

27th August 2014

Post reblogged from sexy trash monster with 145,495 notes

icantactuallyart:

sisterling:

If I ever get married, our vows better be based on the Team Rocket motto.

I vow to protect you from devastation.
To unite our privates and feel sensation.
To pronounce you as my one true love,
and see the glitter of your eyes in the stars above.
*insert*
*names*
Team Rocket, married, committed for life!
Pronounce us now, as husband and wife!
Priiiiiiest! Alright!

Source: kikicanfly

27th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from sexy trash monster with 280,201 notes

eldiablocabra:

i-wanna-build-a-sn0wman:

flawlessspecter:

hiccuptherunt:

sakurasunshine:

keep-calm-and-disney-on:

HERCULES IN THE 2ND GIF OMFG

THIS IS ACTUALLY REALLY IMPORTANT THOUGH

Hercules is THE DEFINITION of a gentleman. Her dress strap slips down and HE PUTS IT BACK UP because he’s like “No, she’s a lady, she deserves my respect. Control yourself. Leave, just leave.”

Imagine if all guys/girls had that much respect for people they were attracted to…the world would be a lot better and safer, I can tell you that.

Also have to remember he’s never had a girl actually hit on him before.

2nd gif: #zeUS TAKE THE WHEEL #I NEED AN ADULT #WHAT AM I SUPPOSED TO DO WITH THIS

if zeus took the wheel this would have ended much differently

HEY WHATS UP?! WANNA BANG??!!

Source: tooshas

27th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from sexy trash monster with 8,884 notes

wasteofprince:

fandomsandcountriesinthetardis:

those darn homos

Source: fandomsandcountriesinthetardis

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from sneezes like frogs with 23,048 notes

flagdemoness:

pamikoo:

Someone asked for clocks.


Cogsworth would lose his shit

flagdemoness:

pamikoo:

Someone asked for clocks.

Cogsworth would lose his shit

Source: pamikoo